Design & Technology

Curriculum Leader: Mr B Frain

ETHOS and AIMS: The ethos of the Design Technology department can be described as wanting students to be able to approach a diverse range of design problems with an open minded and experimental approach that underscores the concept of development being more important than outcome.  This is structured through a framework we refer to as the “design process” and can be used for projects as different as a pen holder design to a moon landing unit.

It is delivered through the use of technologies ranging from a 2H pencil to an industry standard laser cutter.  Alongside these extremes are the normal hand tools and machinery that would be expected in any department, but supported by traditional machinery such as wood and metal lathes that are often deemed outdated by other schools.  We believe that this sort of technology still has it’s worth and that more traditional skills are often the bedrock of a good technological education.

“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes.  Design is knowing which ones to keep.” Scott Adams – Cartoonist

Design and Technology – Food and Nutrition Rotation

Subject Leader(s):
C. Chapman-Hailey ([email protected])

Fortnightly Lessons:
4 lessons

Homework:
4x cooking ingredients (30 minutes)
2x theory (20 minutes)

Year 7 Topics:
In this unit, pupils tackle a design and make assignment on the ‘5 a day’ theme in which they design and make a variety of products.  They will also concentrate on the 5 main nutrient groups which form the basis of healthy living. Health and Safety will also be addressed

Year 8 Topics:
The main aim of this unit is to develop pupils’ understanding of designing and making products for others.  Budgeting and costing will be addressed.  Students will learn about the main nutrients in more detail, deficiencies and food sources. Energy balance and special diets will be discussed. They will also concentrate on building and developing their practical skills learnt in Yr07

Useful Resources:
KS3 Design & Technology Study Guide
ISBN: 978-1-84146-720-7
The Food Book
ISBN: 978-6-435467-95-1

 

Design and Technology – Graphic Products Rotation

Subject Leader(s):
B. Frain ([email protected])
D. Knott ([email protected])

Fortnightly Lessons:
4 lessons

Homework:
2 per project rotation. Each homework task should take approximately 120 minutes of independent study to complete sufficiently

Year 7 Topics:
Health and Safety, Hand tools and equipment, Design process – Brief, Specification and Evaluation, Environmental impact of litter, CAD, Paper mechanisms, Prototypes, 2D-3D drawing

Year 8 Topics:
Health and Safety, Function of Graphic Products, Design process – Brief, Specification and Evaluation, Product analysis, Food labelling and the function of packaging, Colour theory, CAD, 2D-3D drawing

Useful Resources:
KS3 Design & Technology Study Guide
ISBN: 978-1-84146-720-7
www.technologystudent.com

 

Design and Technology – Resistant Materials Rotation

Subject Leader(s):
N. King ([email protected])

Fortnightly Lessons:
4 lessons

Homework:
2 per project rotation. Each homework task should take approximately 120 minutes of independent study to complete sufficiently. 1x revision for quiz

Year 7 Topics:
Health and Safety, Hand tools and Equipment, Design Process – Brief, Specification and Evaluation, Properties of materials, Temporary and permanent joining methods

Year 8 Topics:
Health and Safety, Hand tools and Equipment, Design Process – Brief, Specification and Evaluation, Product Modelling and Analysis, Timber/ Polymer joining methods, Properties of materials, Cams, cranks and levers, 2D / 3D Drawing

Useful Resources:
KS3 Design & Technology Study Guide
ISBN: 978-1-84146-720-7
www.technologystudent.com

 

Design and Technology – Resistant Materials Rotation

Subject Leader(s):
I. Black ([email protected])

Fortnightly Lessons:
4 lessons

Homework:
2 per project rotation. Each homework task should take approximately 120 minutes of independent study to complete sufficiently

Year 7 Topics:
Health and Safety, Hand tools and Equipment, Properties of materials – timber / polymers. Manufacturing processes – soldering / polymers, Basic electronic principles and component function

Year 8 Topics:
Health and Safety, Hand tools and Equipment, Properties of materials – ferrous / non-ferrous, Manufacturing processes – metal

Useful Resources:
KS3 Design & Technology Study Guide
ISBN: 978-1-84146-720-7
www.technologystudent.com

In a bid to offer a variety of pathways through the subject area we offer Design, Food and Hair at KS4:

Design: Presently we offer Graphic Products, Product Design and Resistant Materials as GCSEs at this level. They all follow the same model, but differ in that Graphics students may only use compliant materials such as paper and card to manufacture their product, whereas Product Designers and Resistant Material candidates may use anything. 60% of the grade is coursework based, 40% examination.

Examining board link : www.aqa.org.uk

Food: The Food course (GCSE Food & Nutrition) we offer is the most practical available, giving students real life skills in designing and making their own culinary creations. As Design, 60% of the grade is coursework based, 40% examination.

Examining board link : www.aqa.org.uk

Hair: The Hair course we offer is also the most practical available, giving students a real life introduction to the working practice of a salon. Much of the specification covers Health & Safety and working with clients. There are also practical elements of styling and temporary colouring – cutting hair is not allowed until students are older. As a BTEC this is 100% coursework.

Examining board link : www.edexcel.com

PRODUCT DESIGN 3D DESIGN.

For those KS4 students who are thinking of a career in the creative industries we offer A Level Product Design.

This creative qualification will enable students to gain an understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the theoretical knowledge and practical skills sought by higher education and employers.

As part of this course students will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to consolidate their learning by designing and making prototypes that solve real and relevant problems.